ADHD, It’s Not Your Fault

ADHD Support

Why can’t I focus? Why doesn’t he listen? How come she is always late?

Maybe you or your child has been called lazy, crazy or disorganized one time too many.

For the last 200 years, there have been reports of a disease characterized by impulsivity, inattention and hyperactivity. In the 19th century, this disease was thought to be a defect of moral control.

In 1902, Sir George Still, one of the first English pediatricians, studied children who had serious problems with sustained attention and self-regulation. He discovered that there were brain abnormalities in this population.

Beginning in the 1960’s, the National Institute of Mental Health funded the first study on the use of stimulants in children with ADHD. Since the late 1990’s, there have been significant advancements. There is much greater understanding of brain function in those with ADHD, a new DSM (the code used to describe clinical diagnoses) and many new effective medicines to treat the symptoms of ADHD.

If you feel like you or your loved ones are struggling with symptoms of ADHD, you are not alone.

Nine percent of children, seven percent of adolescents, and four and one half percent of adults have ADHD. Seventy five percent of the time, ADHD is inherited from the parents. (Data compiled by Anthony L. Rostain, MD, University of Pennsylvania)

Some of the other causes of ADHD are smoking, alcohol or drug use during pregnancy, premature birth or other pregnancy complications. Three to seven percent of cases are acquired due to brain trauma, leukemia, disease or other stress factors. (Information compiled by Anthony L. Rostain, MD, University of Pennsylvania)

There are three types of ADHD

Predominantly Inattentive: difficulty organizing and finishing tasks, forgetfulness, difficulty following instruction or conversation

Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive: fidgets, talks excessively, interrupts, has difficulty sitting still (like at meals), says inappropriate things, is more accident prone, young children may climb more

Combined type: Symptoms of above types equally present

(See US National Library of Medicine for full description)

The hyperactive personality is usually easier to recognize. Many times, those who have the inattentive type do not get noticed because their behavior does not stand out as different.

ADHD is a lifelong disorder that is complex and sometimes accompanied by mood challenges or other coexisting condition

The DSM-5 describes the most up to date diagnostic criteria of ADHD. If you suspect that you or your child might fit this classification, see your pediatrician, family doctor or internist to learn more about getting a diagnosis.

Receiving a diagnosis of ADHD does not mean you must take medicine. However, taking the right medicine can be life changing.

Effective treatment often involves medicine and a combination of other modalities. Two of these are Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, a therapy that helps one recognize untrue or negative thoughts and turn them into constructive thoughts, and Coaching, a partnership which helps one move past limiting thoughts and provides the accountability to create and follow through with life-changing action steps.

Meditation, yoga and exercise are fantastic brain balancers as well.

For children with ADHD and other special needs, there are many useful play therapies to help teach them how to interact with their peers and control impulsive behaviors.

If you are married or in a relationship with someone with ADHD, or have children with ADHD, you might feel very unbalanced. One of the most powerful steps you can take to help others is to help yourselves find balance first.

If you are looking for support, Coaching is a great way to empower yourself to make positive change. Together with a coach, you will discover your gifts, envision your goals and create a happy and fulfilling life. You are worth it! focus? Why doesn’t he listen? How come she is always late?

Maybe you or your child has been called lazy, crazy or disorganized one time too many.

For the last 200 years, there have been reports of a disease characterized by impulsivity, inattention and hyperactivity. In the 19th century, this disease was thought to be a defect of moral control.

In 1902, Sir George Still, one of the first English pediatricians, studied children who had serious problems with sustained attention and self-regulation. He discovered that there were brain abnormalities in this population.

Beginning in the 1960’s, the National Institute of Mental Health funded the first study on the use of stimulants in children with ADHD. Since the late 1990’s, there have been significant advancements. There is much greater understanding of brain function in those with ADHD, a new DSM (the code used to describe clinical diagnoses) and many new effective medicines to treat the symptoms of ADHD.

If you feel like you or your loved ones are struggling with symptoms of ADHD, you are not alone.

Nine percent of children, seven percent of adolescents, and four and one half percent of adults have ADHD. Seventy five percent of the time, ADHD is inherited from the parents. (Data compiled by Anthony L. Rostain, MD, University of Pennsylvania)

Some of the other causes of ADHD are smoking, alcohol or drug use during pregnancy, premature birth or other pregnancy complications. Three to seven percent of cases are acquired due to brain trauma, leukemia, disease or other stress factors. (Information compiled by Anthony L. Rostain, MD, University of Pennsylvania)

There are three types of ADHD:

Predominantly Inattentive: difficulty organizing and finishing tasks, forgetfulness, difficulty following instruction or conversation

Predominantly Hyperactive-Impulsive: fidgets, talks excessively, interrupts, has difficulty sitting still (like at meals), says inappropriate things, is more accident prone, young children may climb more

Combined type: Symptoms of above types equally present

(See US National Library of Medicine for full description)

The hyperactive personality is usually easier to recognize. Many times, those who have the inattentive type do not get noticed because their behavior does not stand out as different.

ADHD is a lifelong disorder that is complex and sometimes accompanied by mood challenges or other coexisting conditions

The DSM-5 describes the most up to date diagnostic criteria of ADHD. If you suspect that you or your child might fit this classification, see your pediatrician, family doctor or internist to learn more about getting a diagnosis

Receiving a diagnosis of ADHD does not mean you must take medicine. However, taking the right medicine can be life changing.

Effective treatment often involves medicine and a combination of other modalities. Two of these are Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, a therapy that helps one recognize untrue or negative thoughts and turn them into constructive thoughts, and Coaching, a partnership which helps one move past limiting thoughts and provides the accountability to create and follow through with life-changing action steps.

Meditation, yoga and exercise are fantastic brain balancers as well.

For children with ADHD and other special needs, there are many useful play therapies to help teach them how to interact with their peers and control impulsive behaviors.

If you are married or in a relationship with someone with ADHD, or have children with ADHD, you might feel very unbalanced. One of the most powerful steps you can take to help others is to help yourselves find balance first.

If you are looking for support, Coaching is a great way to empower yourself to make positive change. Together with a coach, you will discover your gifts, envision your goals and create a happy and fulfilling life. You are worth it!

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About Jane Kramer

Jane Kramer, CPC, ELI-MP – As a parent of 3 grown children, one of whom has Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, my understanding of ADHD is both personal and professional. I pursued my Certification in Coaching with The Institute for Professional Excellence in Coaching and am experienced in coaching adults who are challenged by ADHD or live with loved ones with ADHD. I am passionate about my work and keep abreast of the latest information on coping successfully with the challenges of ADHD. If you want to live to your full potential, I will empower you to reach your goals. For more information, please contact me at [email protected]. The website is: www.addfocuscoaching.com

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